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November 2010

We are so happy to announce that we have placed world rights to debut author Natalie Dias Lorenzi's middle-grade novel Flying the Dragon, which tells the alternating stories of Hiroshi, a Japanese boy struggling to adjust to American language and traditions, and his American cousin Susan, who is now faced with needing to be "Japanese enough" for her newly arrived extended family, until they unite as a kite fighting team, to Emily Mitchell at Charlesbridge, for publication in spring 2013.

Natalie has been producing teacher's guides to published children's books for some time now, helping her fellow authors and getting raves for her work, so it's especially wonderful to know her first book will be hitting the shelves soon!

—Erin

Joan and I are so grateful to all of our clients, co-agents, editors, colleagues, supporters, readers, and friends for being in our working lives. We'll be giving thanks tomorrow that we are able to do work we love with so many wonderful folks. Happy Thanksgiving!

—Erin

Shark Vs. Train

Shark Vs. Train
Chris Barton

With the posting of this compilation list looking at three published best-books-of-the-year lists and where they overlapped, Jonathan Hunt and the Heavy Medal blog at School Library Journal reminded us of two things: Chris Barton's Shark Vs. Train (illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld, and published by Little, Brown), which is Chris's second published book, has made three best-of-the-year lists (SLJ, PW, and Kirkus)--and his debut book, The Day-Glo Brothers (illustrated by Tony Persiani, and published by Charlesbridge), made the same three lists last year! That's some record, Chris!

Jonathan's list of overlap titles tells us something else: Shark Vs. Train is in very good company. The other titles on that list are truly outstanding. Congratulations to all!

—Erin

Suspect

Suspect
Kristin Wolden Nitz

Earlier this year we passed news of four EMLA titles that are on the nomination list for the 2011 Best Fiction for Young Adults compiled by the YALSA division of the American Library Association (formerly known as Best Books for Young Adults), The books nominated will continue to be discussed by the committee until the final selected titles are announced in January, but with the latest update of the titles being considered, the nominations are closed—and one more EMLA book made it in under the wire: Kristin Wolden Nitz's Suspect, a whodunit mystery published by Peachtree in October.

Suspect joins  Elizabeth C. Bunce's StarCrossed (Arthur A. Levine Books/Scholastic, October); C. J. Omololu's Dirty Little Secrets (Walker & Co., February); Heather Tomlinson's Toads and Diamonds (Holt, March); and Conrad Wesselhoeft's Adios, NIrvana (Houghton, October), as well as many other wonderful books that are being read and discussed by committee members and teen readers. Congratulations to all!

—Erin

Too Purpley!

Too Purpley!
Jean Reidy

Huge congratulations to Jean Reidy, who has another picture book on the way! Bloomsbury, publisher of Jean's Too Purpley!, Too Pickley!, and the forthcoming Too Princessy!, has just signed All Through the Town, which gives a young child's-eye-view of community with a soothing rhythmic verse. Jean's editor, Michelle Nagler, has signed illustrator Leo Timmers (Who Is Driving?) for the book—in fact, the project came about when Michelle suggested Jean write a young picture book about community, with Leo's artwork in mind.

Jean also has two picture books slated for upcoming release from Disney-Hyperion.

Yay, Jean!

—Erin

As the year begins its wind-down, we welcome the last of our 2010 new arrivals from EMLA authors!

Crosswire, by Dotti Enderle, a middle-grade historical adventure set on the Texas frontier in 1883, published by the Calkins Creek imprint of Boyds Mills Press, has an official November release date, although it's already hit shelves.

Black Radishes, by Susan Lynn Meyer, another middle-grade historical adventure, this time set in rural France during World War II, published by Delacorte (Random House), releases today.

As always, we wish these books into readers' hearts!

—Erin

Dirty Little Secrets

Dirty Little Secrets
C. J. Omololu

Deals are flying fast and furious around here these days! The latest news, hot off today's PW Children's Bookshelf:

"Mary Kate Castellani of Walker & Company has pre-empted to acquire world English rights to Destined by C.J. Omololu (Dirty Little Secrets), in which cello prodigy Cole begins to experience flashes of past lives just as the mysterious Griffon enters her world, bringing with him knowledge, love, and suspicion; a sequel, Fated, was also part of the deal. Bloomsbury U.K. will publish simultaneously starting in summer 2012. Erin Murphy of Erin Murphy Literary Agency was the agent; Rights People is representing translation rights."

These books are a change of pace for C.J. (Cynthia)—she has previously published a picture book and the contemporary realistic Dirty Little Secrets, and has actually been known, in the past, to swear she would never write fantasy or paranormal. Never say never! We're so glad you changed your mind, Cyn—congratulations!

—Erin

Dearest EMLA clients: We've announced the details of the 2011 retreat! If you're not on one of the agency discussion groups and want to attend, please email Erin or Joan for details!

I am so very pleased to announce that Jeannie Mobley's first novel will be hitting shelves in fall 2012! Karen Wojtyla of Margaret K. McElderry Books (S&S) has just acquired Jeannie's middle-grade novel MAGIC CARP.

In the story, the pragmatic daughter of an immigrant coal-miner in early 1900s Colorado makes an impulsive wish on a fish, as the characters in a traditional tale from her homeland of Bohemia did--and finds that her wish, and the ones that follow, comes true, although how much is through luck and how much is through good old-fashioned hard work is hard to determine.

Congratulations, Jeannie!

—Erin